Local 4-Hers Combine Fun and Education With New Commodity Carnival Game at Wisconsin State Fair June 30th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: June 30, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Local 4-Hers Combine Fun and Education With New Commodity Carnival Game at Wisconsin State Fair

CME Group funds Wisconsin 4-H activity to educate youth on economics of agriculture commodities

For Immediate Release 

Madison, WI 4-H teen leaders will help “steer” youth in the right direction at The Wisconsin State Fair this year through a new Commodity Carnival game that walks young people through the steps of bringing steer and cattle to market. The interactive game helps young people understand the economics of agriculture — from balancing the costs of feed, labor, transportation and electricity to preparing for changes in weather, new regulations and other unforeseen obstacles.

CME Group, the world’s leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, and National 4-H Council. are partnering for the second year to bring the Commodity Carnival to 120 state and county fairs in 11 states this summer, including The Wisconsin State Fair. You can also catch the Commodity Carnival at various county fairs across the state!

Building on its success in 2014, educating more than 54,000 youth on agriculture commodities, the Commodity Carnival now will be available beyond the fairgrounds.  New this year, families across the nation will be able to access the Commodity Carnival game online and as a new downloadable app from their mobile devices.

“We are pleased and excited to bring back Commodity Carnival to the Wisconsin State Fair,” said Carissa Brooks, Ag and Animal Science Intern, Wisconsin State 4-H Youth and Development. “Participants this year will gain the experience and understanding of the risks associated with raising steer, and will have the opportunity to receive a variety of great new prizes.”

“We’re pleased to be back for our second year of this program because, although we serve customers in more than 150 countries, our roots have always been in the heart of this country with farm and ranch families,” said CME Group Executive Chairman and President Terry Duffy. “Of the many educational programs we offer, this partnership with National 4-H is one of my favorites, because it gives us the unique opportunity to interact with the next generation of our nation’s food producers in their own communities.”

Run by 4-H youth leaders, Commodity Carnival educates participants in two phases. In the first phase, youth are tasked with “raising” a steer – balancing the costs of feed, health and nutrition, production and energy and resources. Once ready for market, the steer is weighed and the participant drops a disc down a Plinko-style board, with pegs representing elements beyond the youth’s control – parasites, bad weather, health news, government regulations and seasonal demands. At the end of the activity, the participant obtains an increased understanding of the commodities market.

For more information, please visit www.cmegroup.com/4hcarnival.

About 4-H 
4-H is a community of six million young people across America learning leadership, citizenship, and life skills. National 4-H Council is the private sector, non-profit partner of 4-H National Headquarters located at the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) within the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). 4-H programs are implemented by the 109 land-grant universities and the Cooperative Extension System through their 3,100 local Extension offices across the country. Learn more about 4-H at www.4-h.org and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/4-H or www.twitter.com/4-H.

About CME Group 
As the world’s leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace, CME Group (Chicago Mercantile Exchange) is where the world goes to manage risk. It offers the widest range of global benchmark products across all major asset classes. Helping businesses everywhere mitigate the myriad risks they face in today’s uncertain global economy allows them to operate more effectively, create more jobs, and pass benefits on to consumers.

CME Group offers the widest range of agricultural commodity futures and options available on any U.S. exchange. Its agricultural contracts include grains, oilseeds, livestock, dairy products, lumber, coffee, sugar, cocoa and other products. These products are the staples of everyday life and represent the origins of the earliest forward and futures markets. These products serve commodity producers and users seeking risk management and hedging tools, alongside funds and other traders looking to capitalize on the extraordinary opportunities these markets offer. Learn more at www.cmegroup.com

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Research on Soybean Seed Treatment Return on Investment May 27th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: May 27, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Research on Soybean Seed Treatment Return on Investment

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk, Flavorful Insight
ph. 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Research on Soybean Seed Treatment Return on Investment
Madison, WI, May 27, 2014 — Earlier soybean planting coupled with increasing seed costs and higher commodity prices have led to a surge in the number of acres planted with seed treatments. Since 2008, research has been conducted in trials throughout Wisconsin to examine if seed treatments are economically viable for soybean production.
“Our study found differences in yield, profitability and economic risk due to seed treatment and seeding rate,” says Shawn Conley, Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist. “Growers should account for their expected grain sale price and seed treatment use when determining their seeding rate and additionally, the components of the seed treatment should be considered. They need to assess the economic risk and profitability of seed treatments and seeding rates, includ­ing calculating economically optimal seeding rate (EOSR) for each seed treatment.”

ApronMaxx RFC and CruiserMaxx (Syngenta Crop Protection) seed treatments were used to achieve these objectives because they differ in their components and relative cost per unit. This study was conducted in 2012 and 2013 at nine Wisconsin locations. All locations were planted in 15 inch rows within the first 3 weeks of May.

Researchers found that reduc­ing seeding rates when using no seed treatment or a fungicide only seed treatment (ApronMaxx) may be too risky and provided minimal profit gains. In contrast, the study also showed that a fungicide/insecticide seed treatment (CruiserMaxx) reduced economic risk and increased profit across an array of environments, seeding rates (80,000–140,000 seeds/a), and grain sale prices ($9/bu and $12/bu).

Furthermore, to realize the lowest risk and highest profit increase with CruiserMaxx, producers should consider lowering their seeding rates to the EOSR according to their expected grain sale price. The EOSR for CruiserMaxx ranged from 94,000 to 101,000 seeds/a and was on average, 16% (18,000 seeds/a) less than ApronMaxx and the UTC across grain sale prices of $9/bu and $12/bu.

“It is important to examine these responses across a variety of soybean commodity prices and we started by examining $6, $9 and $12/bu. soybeans,” says Conley. “Using the different cost-price structures, we quantified the probability of breaking even based on the percentage increase or decrease in yield with the use of a seed treatment compared to the untreated control.”

For more information on this research, visit www.coolbean.info/library/documents/SoybeanTreatmentRisk_2014_FINAL.pdf

                                                                                  ###

The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level. For more information, visit www.wisoybean.org.

Wisconsin Soybean Farm Visit Inspires Urban Fourth-Graders May 23rd, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: May 23, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Soybean Farm Visit Inspires Urban Fourth-Graders

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Madison, WI, May 23, 2014—With a scent of spring in the air, surrounded by moist soil and soybean seedlings, farm-to-table classroom agriculture lessons naturally come alive. That was fourth grade teacher Trinette Stillman’s premise, and she was right. After students from her class at Holy Family Parish School in Whitefish Bay visited Mike Cerny’s Sharon, WI, soybean farm on May 19, they developed a taste for roasted soynuts, and came away with an enhanced appreciation for foods grown in Wisconsin.

Students also were amazed by the equipment and technology Mike Cerny uses, Stillman says. “They loved it when he showed them how math impacts his job. The computer tracking and autopilot of the tractor were also surprising.”  Cerny, president of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, offered students an opportunity to observe plant life cycles and meet some of the people responsible for growing and producing the foods they eat. He answered student questions about irrigation, how seeds are planted without damaging them, and how many seeds are planted and harvested.

Bob Karls, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, provided soy snacks during the student visit. “By far, the big hit was soybean soynuts,” says Trinette Stillman. “They loved them, and continue talking about them. Some students took some home to share, and asked their parents to buy them. One student saved all of hers to take home and share with her cousins, who are coming to visit.”

Stillman was inspired by reading the soybean curriculum book, Coolbean the Soybean, written by Shawn Conley, Ph.D., with Judy Mannes and Marcia Rehns. Stillman knew the agricultural topic could bring math, vocabulary and science lessons alive for her fourth grade students. The book covers many fourth grade standards, including identifying plant characteristics, exploring life cycles, scientific method and reproduction of plants. Distributed to fourth grade classrooms by the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, the book is part of the board’s initiative to create urban-rural partnerships that educate urban children about food and agriculture.

When her students from Holy Family Parish School—part of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee—moved out of their classroom into the fields of Mike Cerny’s farm, they learned firsthand about where their food comes from and increased their appreciation for agriculture. In class, Trinette Stillman’s students used Coolbean the Soybean activities to review the photosynthesis process, learn about pollination and create a cycle picture of soybean germination. In addition, they are cultivating two soybean plants, using scientific methods to determine which soil will provide better growth.

“We continue to observe the soybeans we are growing,” Stillman says. “In a couple of weeks, we have an end-of-the-year celebration. We typically bring in food to share that is made in Wisconsin. This year, we will also add any food made with soybeans.”

For details about classroom materials to increase agricultural literary, and information about Wisconsin-grown soybeans and their uses, visit the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board website at www.wisoybean.org.

#

The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin soybean producers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. WSMB is committed to providing statewide soy education and outreach programs that inform consumers about the benefits of soy. It offers a comprehensive soy curriculum for educators, and partners with the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Ag in the Classroom to provide Soybean Science Kits and lessons that increase agricultural literacy.

A Growing Interest: Area Fourth Grade Students to Visit a Wisconsin Soybean Farm May 8th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: May 8, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

A Growing Interest: Area Fourth Grade Students to Visit a Wisconsin Soybean Farm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight
515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Photos Available on Request

A Growing Interest: Area Fourth Grade Students to Visit a Wisconsin Soybean Farm

Madison, WI, May 8, 2014—A farm-to-table soybean lesson is moving some area students out of their urban classroom and into the field on May 19.  That’s when fourth graders from Holy Family Parish School, part of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, will get a firsthand look at how their food is grown. Thanks to a Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board initiative, urban-rural partnerships are educating urban children about where their food comes from. To enhance their plant and agriculture studies, the class will visit the Sharon, WI, soybean farm of Mike Cerny, president of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board.

Recently, the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board provided fourth grade classes in Wisconsin with copies of the book, Coolbean the Soybean by Shawn Conley, Ph.D., with Judy Mannes and Marcia Rehns. The book captured the imagination of fourth grade teacher Trinette Stillman at Holy Family Parish School in Whitefish Bay.

Stillman saw the possibilities for an agricultural topic that could illustrate plant characteristics and life cycles for her students. “The book [Coolbean the Soybean] was very well written and covered many of the standards,” she says. “Then I went online and reviewed the videos and materials that are made available.  Again, I was excited about the depth of the material and the way it reached out to a younger audience.  Lastly, I like to teach the students about everyday items that they take for granted, and soybeans definitely fall within this category.”

The Holy Family Parish School fourth graders already have questions to be answered during their trip to the farm. Among other topics, they’re curious to learn how much nitrogen soybeans produce, and how soybeans are harvested. Bob Karls, Executive Director of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, will be on hand to greet students at the farm. As part of the outreach program, he will provide snacks of soymilk, soy cookies and soy nuts to bring alive their lesson about the way Wisconsin soybeans are grown, harvested and enjoyed.

For details about classroom materials to increase agricultural literary, and information about Wisconsin-grown soybeans and their uses, visit the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board website at www.wisoybean.org.
                                                                                                #
The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin soybean producers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. WSMB is committed to providing statewide soy education and outreach programs that inform consumers about the benefits of soy. It offers a comprehensive soy curriculum for educators, and partners with the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Ag in the Classroom to provide Soybean Science Kits and lessons that increase agricultural literacy.

Kick Off Picnic Season with Easy Vegetable Dip Recipes April 30th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: April 30, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Kick Off Picnic Season with Easy Vegetable Dip Recipes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Photo available
Media Contact:
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com
515-491-8636

Kick Off Picnic Season with Easy Vegetable Dip Recipes

Madison, WI April 30, 2014—Memorial Day marks the beginning of picnic season and summer fun that includes food-on-the-go. This year, discover how easy it is to save money and make treats you can take along on outings with family and friends. Simply pack fresh vegetables and tofu-based dip into a container and prepare to snack in style. The Soyfoods Council offers convenient recipes like Tofu Ranch Dressing that allow you to indulge while eating healthfully. Here are tips for creating versatile take-along snacks made with tofu.

• Before you buy tofu, consider what you need it to do. Firm water-packed tofu will keep its shape, whether it’s sliced, diced or placed on the grill. Silken tofu is ideal for blending smoothies, making fruit and vegetable dips, and for any recipe that requires a smooth consistency.
• Remember that tofu adds protein to your vegetables, with less fat and no cholesterol. That makes tofu dip an ideal choice for picnics, backyard barbecues and all-around summer fun.
• Discover how easy and economical homemade salad dressings can be. All you need are a food processor and a few ingredients.

For Tofu Ranch Dressing, start with a package of silken tofu. Drain it, and add it to a food processor with 5 Tbsp. soybean oil, 2 Tbsp. lemon juice, 1 tsp. garlic powder, 1 tsp. parsley, 1 tsp. onion powder, 1 tsp. black pepper and 2 tsp. salt (or to taste). Blend, and add a little water if the dip consistency is too thick. Your vegetable dip is ready!

For other tofu dip ideas, add sala

Controlling Yield-Limiting Factors for Wisconsin Soybean Yields April 23rd, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: April 23, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Controlling Yield-Limiting Factors for Wisconsin Soybean Yields


FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk, Executive Director of The Soyfoods Council,

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Controlling Yield-Limiting Factors for Wisconsin Soybean Yields 

Madison, WI, April 2014 —Wisconsin soybean farmers face many unique challenges during the growing season, most notably the impact of the weather on planting, growing and harvest conditions. The variability in weather can play a major role in determining the level of soybean insect, weed and disease pressure. Making timely decisions during the crop season can be the key to maximizing yields.

“Farmers have many considerations that effect soybean yield including variety selection, planting date deciding to apply inputs such as potassium, calibrating their planters for maximum yield and managing for seedling and plant diseases, yield-robbing pests and seedling,” says Shawn Conley, Wisconsin State Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist. “Timely decision-making can be the key to maximizing profit potential with these most yield-limiting challenges.”

He recommends that soybean farmers compare variety performance results from multiple sources including university and private results, locations and environments.

“One common mistake can be only looking at local data from your own farm, a neighbor’s farm or from county data,” Conley says. “Local data, while interesting, only provide a glimpse at how well that soybean variety performed last year in a narrow area. Comparing variety performance over many different environments and factors will offer farmers the best predictive ability for next year’s environment.”

Planting multiple soybean varieties to diversify plant genetics may be a good strategy in lowering risks of
yield loss due to stress factors. Conley recommends paying attention to maturity groups because later-maturity group soybeans often lead to increased yield; however, timeliness of harvest and frost must be considered.

Once a group of high-yielding soybean varieties has been selected, the next decision is choosing varieties that meet specific disease, insect and weed resistance/tolerance characteristics keeping specific fields in mind.

Planting date can be one of the most important and least expensive cultural considerations that impact soybean yield.

Research conducted at the University of Wisconsin’s Arlington Agricultural Research Station has shown an average yield loss of 0.4 bushels per acre per day when soybean planting has been delayed past the first week in May. Yield loss in delayed plantings can be attributed to decreased seed number per acre.

Delayed plantings of soybeans can partially compensate for reduced pod number per acre through increased seed size. Early soybean planting dates can lead to increased risk of seedling diseases, white mold, brown stem rot (BSR) and sudden death syndrome (SDS).

Row spacing can be a factor in yields as well. The yield response of soybeans in wide rows versus narrow can vary by zero to 18 percent. The amount of water and light drives yield.  On average, research shows a seven percent yield difference between wide (30 or more inches) and narrow (15 inches and less) rows.
There can be greater yield loss in wide rows (more than 30 inches) versus narrow (less than 15 inches) because of increased weed competition. Row spacing does not affect canopy penetration of foliar fungicides.
Narrow row spacing may increase incidence of white mold; however, genetics (disease tolerance) and environment play a much greater role in managing this disease than row spacing. Wheel tracks from ground-driven sprayers decrease grain yield in 7.5- and 15-inch-spaced rows when applied to R3 and R5 (reproductive stages) soybeans. The extent of yield loss can be based on sprayer boom width.
More topics for the soybean growing season are covered in the Wisconsin Soybean pocket guide available at www.coolbean.info/library/documents/WI_Soybean_Pocket_Guide.pdf.  In addition, Conley provides regular updates on soybean information. Visit www.coolbean.info.

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The Wisconsin Soybean

Disease and Weed Management for Wisconsin Soybeans April 15th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: April 15, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Disease and Weed Management for Wisconsin Soybeans

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk, Executive Director of The Soyfoods Council,

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Disease and Weed Management for Wisconsin Soybeans

Madison, WI, April 2014 — With the extreme cold and snow cover in many parts of the country this past winter, many farmers wonder about the weather’s impact on disease and weed pressures in the upcoming planting and growing season.

“We do not know how the year will unfold for soybean farmers but in any case, farmers should be aware of potential yield-robbing diseases and weeds and be prepared to take action,” says Shawn Conley, Wisconsin State Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist.

Seedling diseases caused by Pythium, Phytophthora, Phomopsis and Rhizoctonia can be problems immediately. Early-season issues can include seed rots or seedling mortality (damping-off). Conditions that favor the development of early-season seedling issues include wet soil conditions at planting, slow germination and/or slow growth of seedlings, and poor seed quality. Early-season infection can also have a long latent period with symptoms not showing up until reproductive periods (for  example, Phytophthora or “root rot” as most farmers know it).

“Prevention management includes the use of high-quality soybean seed, fungicide seed treatments
and resistant varieties,” Conley says.

A well-designed weed management plan can be essential in maximizing soybean yields.

“Effective weed control can be vital in minimizing the negative effects from competition for light, water and other essential elements for plants,” says Conley. “Reduced weed competition maximizes early-season crop growth rate, which quickens the time to full canopy closure and in turn maximizes intercepted light converted to soybean yield.”

An effective weed management plan should include:
– Scouting reports that identifies target weed species so control efforts can be appropriately focused.
– Effective weed control preplanting so soybean seeds have a weed-free seedbed.
– Herbicides, with residual weed control activity, increases the flexibility for the proper timing of postemergence applications. This reduces the number of weeds exposed to postemergence herbicides and reduces the variability in the size of weeds at postemergence spray timings.
– Rotate herbicide modes of action and tank-mix combinations to delay the increase of weed species that are difficult to control with specific herbicides and delay herbicide resistance.

For specific information on scouting fields for Sudden Death Syndrome, Brown Stem Rot, Soybean cyst nematode and others, check out the Wisconsin Soybean pocket guide available at www.coolbean.info/library/documents/WI_Soybean_Pocket_Guide.pdf.  The pocket guide is made possible in part through checkoff funds of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board.

In addition, Conley provides regular updates on soybean information. Visit www.coolbean.info throughout the growing season for latest information on soybean issues.
###
The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated check off, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level. For more information, visit www.wisoybean.org.

Improving Soybean Quality March 20th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 20, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Improving Soybean Quality

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk, Executive Director of The Soyfoods Council,

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Improving Soybean Quality

Madison, WI, March, 2014 — Soybeans are a valuable crop to Wisconsin and the United States and a soybean specialist says he and fellow researchers are always looking at ways to help farmers improve soybean quality and yield. 
From 2000 to 2012, the annual value of the U.S. crop has gone from more than $10 billion to almost $45 billion. Last year, Wisconsin’s soybean crop brought almost $1 billion in revenue. More acres will likely be planted to soybeans in 2014.

Strong soybean yields are possible even during difficult growing seasons such as 2013. Growers who participated in Wisconsin’s soybean yield contest recorded high yields. Green County producer Rick DeVoe from Monroe, had a yield of 92.1 bushels last year with Pioneer P28T33R to top the Wisconsin’s soybean yield contest.

Shawn Conley, state soybean specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, surveyed crop consultants, technical service providers and seed industry-reps from across the state during the 2014 Agronomy Update meetings.  They consistently indicated that soybean seed treatments provided the most consistent return on investment for soybeans. Conley’s research supports this.

Conley and his colleagues have been working on projects that show the effect of input interactions on yield and responses to traits including multiple input interactions on yield, RR1 versus RR2Y, seed treatment, foliar fertilizer, foliar insecticide and foliar fungicide.

“In addition to choosing quality soybean genetics, growers sometimes plant earlier to increase yields,” says Conley. “However, sometimes earlier plantings are prone to more disease such as Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS). Therefore if you are pushing for higher yields through earlier planting then choose varieties with the best disease tolerance ratings for the disease issues on your farm,” he says.

Conley says a new study found a negative correlation between SCN and SDS, indicating that as the probability of finding SDS in a soil sample increases, the chance of finding SCN in the same sample decreases.  However, as the odds of detecting SDS in soil approaches 100 percent, the likelihood of finding SCN in Wisconsin soybean fields is estimated at just 60 percent.

Fifteen years ago, less than 10 percent of soybean acres had seed treatments. This year it’s projected to be more than 70 percent. In generation one seed treatment research (2008-2010), Conley compared two, Apron Maxx RFC and Cruiser Maxx. With $12 beans, he determined there an 84 percent chance of breakeven with Apron Maxx and 88 percent chance with Cruiser Maxx at a 40-bushel average yield.
Conley provides regular updates on soybean information. Visit www.coolbean.info.
###

Improving Soybean Quality March 19th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 19, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Improving Soybean Quality

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk
515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Improving Soybean Quality

Madison, WI, March 19, 2014 — Soybeans are a valuable crop to Wisconsin and the United States and a soybean specialist says he and fellow researchers are always looking at ways to help farmers improve soybean quality and yield. 
From 2000 to 2012, the annual value of the U.S. crop has gone from more than $10 billion to almost $45 billion. Last year, Wisconsin’s soybean crop brought almost $1 billion in revenue. More acres will likely be planted to soybeans in 2014.

Strong soybean yields are possible even during difficult growing seasons such as 2013. Growers who participated in Wisconsin’s soybean yield contest recorded high yields. Green County producer Rick DeVoe from Monroe, had a yield of 92.1 bushels last year with Pioneer P28T33R to top the Wisconsin’s soybean yield contest.
Shawn Conley, state soybean specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison, surveyed crop consultants, technical service providers and seed industry-reps from across the state during the 2014 Agronomy Update meetings.  They consistently indicated that soybean seed treatments provided the most consistent return on investment for soybeans. Conley’s research supports this.

Conley and his colleagues have been working on projects that show the effect of input interactions on yield and responses to traits including multiple input interactions on yield, RR1 versus RR2Y, seed treatment, foliar fertilizer, foliar insecticide and foliar fungicide.

“In addition to choosing quality soybean genetics, growers sometimes plant earlier to increase yields,” says Conley.

“However, sometimes earlier plantings are prone to more disease such as Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS). Therefore if you are pushing for higher yields through earlier planting then choose varieties with the best disease tolerance ratings for the disease issues on your farm,” he says.

Conley says a new study found a negative correlation between SCN and SDS, indicating that as the probability of finding SDS in a soil sample increases, the chance of finding SCN in the same sample decreases.  However, as the odds of detecting SDS in soil approaches 100 percent, the likelihood of finding SCN in Wisconsin soybean fields is estimated at just 60 percent.

Fifteen years ago, less than 10 percent of soybean acres had seed treatments. This year it’s projected to be more than 70 percent. In generation one seed treatment research (2008-2010), Conley compared two, Apron Maxx RFC and Cruiser Maxx. With $12 beans, he determined there an 84 percent chance of breakeven with Apron Maxx and 88 percent chance with Cruiser Maxx at a 40-bushel average yield.
Conley provides regular updates on soybean information. Visit www.coolbean.info.
###
The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated check off, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level. For more information, visit www.wisoybean.org

National Agricultural Literacy Week – Coolbean the Soybean book sent to all 4th grade teachers in Wisconsin March 18th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 18, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

National Agricultural Literacy Week – Coolbean the Soybean book sent to all 4th grade teachers in Wisconsin

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SCHEDUAL AN INTERVIEW                                                
Linda Funk, Flavorful Insight
515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
National Agricultural Literacy Week
Coolbean the Soybean book sent to all 4th grade teachers in Wisconsin

Madison, WI, March 18, 2014—The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board is celebrating National Agricultural Literacy Week, March 17–21, by mailing copies of Coolbean the Soybean to 4th grade teachers in the state of Wisconsin. Coolbean was written by Shawn Conley, PhD, an agronomy professor and Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Coolbean the Soybean explains the job of farmers and agronomists through characters named Haila and Aliah, respectively, who Conley named after his daughters. Along the way, Coolbean explains modern farming techniques, how a seed becomes a plant and then produces a crop. The book tells the story of how soil, sunshine, and water affect the growth of the plant.
The target audience is Grades 3–5. The content was developed in collaboration with a professional science writer who ensured the material is age appropriate and matches Common Core Standards in Reading and Next Generation Science Standards. Hands-on learning activities to accompany the book are available at www.COOLBEANtheSoybean.org.
A grassroots, farmer-led organization, the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board is committed to statewide education and outreach programs, including communication initiatives directed at youth, with a focus on the Wisconsin soybean industry and its ability to feed the hungry world while being stewards of the land we farm.
The book was published by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. The Societies publish quality, peer-reviewed books, including works for children, in an effort to grow future scientists and to cultivate an appreciation for agricultural sciences, land stewardship, and the innovation required to sustain a growing global population.
Wisconsin teachers may contact Linda Funk at Flavorful Insight (515-491-8636). All other inquiries should be directed to Lisa Al-Amoodi, managing editor of books for the Societies at lalamoodi@sciencesocieties.org.
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The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated check off, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level. For more information, visit www.wisoybean.org

Think Twice Before Replanting Soybeans March 4th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 4, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Think Twice Before Replanting Soybeans

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Think Twice Before Replanting Soybeans

Madison, WI, March 4, 2014 —Inclement weather coupled with insect or disease pressure associated with spring planting sometimes can require replanting of soybeans. However, a Wisconsin soybean researcher says farmers may want to make some considerations before investing in replanting soybeans.

“Research is finding that similar yields among reduced plant stands due to the soybean plants compensatory ability and diminished yield potential of replanted or later planted soybeans are reasons that farmers may want to consider not replanting,” says Shawn Conley, state soybean specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

A study was conducted in 2012 and 2013 at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station, Arlington, WI on replanting. Twelve different replant scenarios were planted in 15 inch rows during early May, late May, and mid-June. The replanted portions of the plots were in­terseeded between the rows of the initial soybean stand. ApronMaxx RFC and Cruiser­Maxx (Syngenta Crop Protection) seed treatments were used to compare a fungicide only seed treatment with one that also contains an insecticide.

Objectives of the research was to determine the threshold for replanting soybean stands, evaluate replanting options and quantify the effect of seed treatments and planting date on replant decisions.

Determine the Initial Plant Stand

The first step in making an informed replant decision is determining the initial plant stand. Soybean stands can be deceiving to the eye sometimes, especially in narrow rows (<15 inch), where stands can be greatly underestimated. Therefore, using the hula hoop method or counting the number of plants in a row is needed to accurately determine the plant stand. If severe weather causes stand reduction and/or plant injury, stand counts should be performed 3-5 days after damage has occurred to give the plants time to recover. Only live plants that are expected to survive should be counted.

Replant Threshold

“Our study demonstrated that replanting soybean stands below the threshold (100,000 plants/a) by filling in the existing stand, increased yields regardless of the date (May- June 20th) and seed treatment use,” Conley says. “Below threshold plant stands should be filled in with enough seed to bring the final stand above 100,000 plants/a. Using tillage and replanting the entire stand greatly limited yield potential, even at replant seeding rates of 220,000 seeds/a. This is due to the entire plant stand being replanted or essentially planted later, which reduces yields by 0.32 bu/a/day on average. These replant recom­mendations are applicable through June 20th in southern WI, where replanting after this date is not advised.

“Traditionally, the notion of adequate weed control has led producers to desire higher plant stands to quickly shade out competing weeds,” Conley says. “However, pre-herbicide use and modern post herbicide technology has essentially eliminated this concern. This study only evaluated soybean replanting in terms of yield and did not take into account the economics of a replant decision, which include additional seed, fuel, labor, and machinery costs; along with potential crop insurance replant payments. Pro­ducers should consult their crop insurance agent before making any replant decisions. Ultimately, the producer’s efforts should be placed on using this data in conjunction with their own finances to determine if replanting will increase economic return.”

For more information on this research, go to http://www.coolbean.info/library/documents/SoybeanReplant_2014_FINAL.pdf

Wisconsin Soybean Farmers: Apply by April 4 for 2014 See for Yourself Program January 23rd, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: January 23, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Soybean Farmers: Apply by April 4 for 2014 See for Yourself Program

Wisconsin Soybean Farmers: Apply by April 4 for 2014 See for Yourself Program
Learn how the U.S. Soybean Checkoff Investment Works

Madison, WI, January 23, 2014 — This summer, 10 U.S. soybean farmers from across the country will get the chance to see how the United Soybean Board (USB) puts their soy checkoff to work.

Wisconsin soybean farmers are encouraged to apply for the 2014 See for Yourself program that will take place August 15-22, 2014. Ten selected farmer-participants will have the opportunity to learn about and evaluate specific investment areas of the soy checkoff, such as international marketing, animal agriculture, industrial uses and soybean farmers’ freedom to operate

Participants will first meet in St. Louis, headquarters of USB, to receive an overview of the organization and see how the checkoff works on behalf of soybean farmers domestically. Since half of all soybeans are exported, participants will then travel internationally to experience how international customers use soy. USB will cover all travel, lodging and meal expenses.

Wisconsin soybean farmer and director on the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, Jonathan Gibbs witnessed first-hand some of the many ways soybeans are used during the USB’s 2013 See for Yourself program. Gibbs was selected as one of 10 U.S. soybean farmers from across the country to participate and encourages other Wisconsin soybean farmers to apply for this once-in-a lifetime learning experience.  Gibbs explains “I took away a lot of information from our roundtable discussion with our customer in Columbia. They want to integrate more animal protein into their people’s diet, and they’d like us to be part of that process.  I also learned the value of good infrastructure, and that without it, the cost of product can go substantially higher once you ship it to the end user. “ 

All interested soybean farmers can apply for the See for Yourself program by filling out the online application located on the USB website by April 4th. To learn more about the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board and its work, visit the website at www.wisoybean.org or for more information.

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The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin soybean producers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. WSMB is committed to providing statewide soy education and outreach programs that inform consumers about the benefits of soy. It offers a comprehensive soy curriculum for educators, and partners with the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Ag in the Classroom to provide Soybean Science Kits and lessons that increase agricultural literacy.