Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board Continues Free Nematode Testing Program for 2015 March 30th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 30, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board Continues Free Nematode Testing Program for 2015

Madison, WI, March, 2015 – Four out of every five animals on earth today is a nematode so it is not surprising that agricultural fields are home to many nematode species. Fortunately, most nematodes are beneficial to crop growth and soil health because their activities help decompose crop residues and cycle nitrogen and other nutrients. Pest nematodes do not threaten yield if their numbers remain low. The key to avoiding population explosions of nematode pests is to be proactive – know what the situation is and take appropriate measures when nematode numbers indicate a problem is brewing.

In 2015, the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board is again offering the expanded nematode testing program to include other pest nematodes in addition to soybean cyst nematode (SCN). These nematodes are less damaging to soybeans than SCN but can cause enough yield loss to warrant treatment.

“As is the case for SCN, there are no rescue treatments for nematodes so the primary purpose of this year’s soil test is to plan for next year’s crop,” says Shawn Conley, Soybean and Wheat Extension Specialist. “Soil samples collected in corn for nematode analysis have predictive value for explaining yield if they are collected before the corn V6 growth stage. Sampling early in the season will provide information about the risk potential for the current corn crop and the next soybean crop.”

Eggs of SCN persist in the soil between soybean crops so a sample can be submitted any time that is convenient. The soil test report indicates the number of eggs in the sample and is useful for selecting the right variety for the next soybean crop. Retests of fields planted with SCN-resistant varieties over multiple years shows how the nematode population is responding to variety resistance and provides an early warning should the nematode population adapt to host genetics.

The assays used to recover nematode pests other than SCN in soil require that the nematodes are alive. So, it is important to keep the samples moist and at least room temperature cool. Collecting a sample that includes multiple cores ensures that there will be plenty of root pieces to assay. It is not necessary to include live plants in the sample. The soil test report will indicate which pest nematodes are present and at what quantities and their damage potential to soybean and corn based on the numbers recovered.

Free soil sample test kits are available now and can be requested at freescntest@mailplus.wisc.edu.

For more information on SCN testing and management practices to help reduce the losses from this pest, please contact: Shawn Conley: spconley@wisc.edu608-262-7975 or visit www.coolbean.info.

###

Wisconsin Soybean Association Elects New Officers March 27th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 27, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Soybean Association Elects New Officers

Madison, WI,   March 2015 — The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) held its annual meeting January 29, 2015, in conjunction with the Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo. WSA members unanimously re-elected; Mike Bertram, DeForest, John Simon, Oconomowoc and Dan Lutz, Scandinavia. Also elected to the board was Rochelle Schnadt, Lodi and Brad Kremer, Pittsville.

The group also elected its officers for the coming year. Dan Roe of Monticello will serve as president. “I look forward to leading the Wisconsin Soybean Association and focusing on the legislative issues that directly affect the Wisconsin soybean farmers” said Roe. Along with Roe, officers elected include Julia Engler of Orfordville, president elect; Don Lutz of Scandinavia, secretary; and Mike Bertram of DeForest, treasurer.

# # #
Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) Founded in 1972, the Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) is a grassroots, farmer-led, membership organization. Since the soybean checkoff is prohibited by law from lobbying, WSA works to ensure that sound policies are in place to enhance the future of soybean farming. We work on behalf of our 1,200 members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level. For more information go to www.wisoybean.org

Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board Continues Free Nematode Testing Program for 2015 March 25th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 25, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board Continues Free Nematode Testing Program for 2015

Four out of every five animals on earth today is a nematode so it is not surprising that agricultural fields are home to many nematode species. Fortunately, most nematodes are beneficial to crop growth and soil health because their activities help decompose crop residues and cycle nitrogen and other nutrients. Pest nematodes do not threaten yield if their numbers remain low. The key to avoiding population explosions of nematode pests is to be proactive – know what the situation is and take appropriate measures when nematode numbers indicate a problem is brewing.
The WSMB sponsors free nematode testing to help producers stay ahead of the most important nematode pest of soybean, the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) (Figure 1). Eggs of SCN persist in the soil between soybean crops so a sample can be submitted any time that is convenient. The soil test report indicates the number of eggs in the sample and is useful for selecting the right variety for the next soybean crop. Retests of fields planted with SCN-resistant varieties over multiple years shows how the nematode population is responding to variety resistance and provides an early warning should the nematode population adapt to host genetics.

Figure 1. WI Counties Confirmed to Have SCN as of 2013.

 

In 2015, the WSMB is again offering the expanded nematode testing program to include other pest nematodes in addition to SCN. These nematodes are less damaging to soybean than SCN but can cause enough yield loss to warrant treatment. As is the case for SCN, there are no rescue treatments for nematodes so the primary purpose of this year’s soil test is to plan for next year’s crop. Soil samples collected in corn for nematode analysis have predictive value for explaining yield if they are collected before the corn V6 growth stage. Sampling early in the season will provide information about the risk potential for the current corn crop AND the next soybean crop.
The assays used to recover nematode pests other than SCN in soil require that the nematodes are alive. So, it is important to keep the samples moist and at least room temperature cool. Collecting a sample that includes multiple cores ensures that there will be plenty of root pieces to assay. It is not necessary to include live plants in the sample. The soil test report will indicate which pest nematodes are present and at what quantities and their damage potential to soybean and corn based on the numbers recovered.

Free soil sample test kits are available now and can be requested at (freescntest@mailplus.wisc.edu).

For more information on SCN testing and management practices to help reduce the losses from this pest, please contact: Shawn Conley: spconley@wisc.edu; 608-262-7975 or visit www.coolbean.info.
Remember the first step in fixing a nematode problem is to know if you have one! The WSMB sponsored nematode testing program provides you that opportunity.

Please click for additional soybean cyst nematode resources.

April is Soyfoods Month March 24th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 24, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

April is Soyfoods Month

Soyfoods for Spring: Immerse Yourself in Fresh Flavors of the Season

Ankeny, Iowa, March 24, 2015—If you look forward to spring because it brings with it your favorite seasonal foods, let soyfoods lead the way into warm weather culinary delights. It’s no coincidence that April is National Soyfoods Month. Nothing complements fresh asparagus or baby salad greens like the savory notes of soy sauce, tamari and miso. Protein-packed soyfoods also make it easy to create meals around spring ingredients.

Unlike many other high protein foods, soyfoods are low in saturated fat and have no cholesterol. A single serving offers from 7 to 15 grams of high-quality protein. Discover the benefits of soy not only as a protein, but also as a versatile ingredient to celebrate the flavors of the season. Here are a few recipe ideas from The Soyfoods Council to help you welcome spring.

Grilled asparagus with tofu tamari dressing is made with robust asparagus stalks and a dressing that combines water-packed soft tofu, lemon juice and lemon zest, chopped garlic, olive oil and sesame seeds. Grilled vegetables are a great way to welcome grilling season.

Roasted lamb with garlic mousse and miso mustard vinaigrette is another spring specialty. This recipe combines the flavors of white miso paste with other spring ingredients such as fresh mint, rosemary and edamame.

Spring chicken ideas focus on bright flavor combinations, such as One-Pan Spring Chicken with Asparagus and Edamame. You’ll find this and other recipe suggestions on the Soyfoods Council website.

Garden pea soup is a refreshing spring appetizer. Make it with pureed sweet peas and fresh mint, thickened with a little silken tofu and flavored with a bit of curry.

Fresh herbs and salad greens are some of the first culinary signs of spring. Basil lime dressing is one of the many herb-based dressing ideas provided by The Soyfoods Council. Ingredients include soft silken tofu, Greek yogurt, lemon and lime juice, green spring onions and fresh basil leaves. Try it with a salad of baby greens, berries, pecans and strips of fresh basil.

Berries and fruit flavors create light spring desserts. Sprinkle fresh raspberries or wild strawberries atop refreshing light bites like mini lemon rosemary pies. The pies are made with mini fillo shells dipped in vanilla-flavored candy coating. The filling combines lemon-flavored gelatin powder, firm silken tofu, sugar, non-dairy whipped topping, chopped fresh rosemary leaves and lemon zest.

For more spring recipe inspirations, research studies about soyfoods and your health, nutrition data and cooking tips, visit the Soyfoods Council website at www.thesoyfoodscouncil.com.

#

About the Soyfoods Council: The Soyfoods Council is a non-profit organization, created and funded by Iowa soybean farmers, providing a complete resource to increase awareness of soyfoods, educate and inform media, healthcare professionals, consumers and the retail and foodservice market about the many benefits of soyfoods.  Iowa is the country’s number one grower of soybeans and is the Soyfoods Capital of the world.

About the Role of Soyfoods in a Healthful Diet: Soyfoods have played an important role in Asian cuisines for centuries.  In recent years they have become popular in Western countries because of their nutrition and health properties.  Soyfoods are excellent sources of high-quality protein and provide a healthy mix of polyunsaturated fat.  In addition, independent of their nutrient content, there is very intriguing evidence indicating soyfoods reduce risk of several chronic diseases including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis and certain forms of cancer.  All individuals are well advised to eat a couple of servings of soyfoods every day.

Brad Kremer, newly elected board member to Wisconsin Soybean Association, accepts plaque, with his wife, Nicole, upon completion of the ASA DuPont Young Leaders training March 17th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: March 17, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Brad Kremer, newly elected board member to Wisconsin Soybean Association, accepts plaque, with his wife, Nicole, upon completion of the ASA DuPont Young Leaders training

ASA DuPont Young Leaders Explore Issues, Marketing During Final Phase of Training

St. Louis, Mo. (March 17, 2015), The 31st class of ASA DuPont Young Leaders completed their training, Feb. 24 – 28, 2015 in Phoenix, Ariz. in conjunction with the annual Commodity Classic Convention and Trade Show.

“The DuPont Young Leader Program fills a critical role in the soybean industry by identifying new and emerging leaders and then training them to be strong voices and advocates for agriculture,” said Wade Cowan, ASA President. “We’re grateful to DuPont Pioneer and DuPont for their commitment to this program and for helping secure the future of the soybean industry. After spending time with this year’s class, I can assure you the soybean industry is in good hands.”

While in Phoenix, the Young Leaders participated in leadership and marketing training, issues updates and discussion and were recognized at ASA’s annual awards banquet.

The 2015 class of ASA DuPont Young Leaders participating in the Phoenix training includes: Kyle Bridgeforth, Ala.; Dave McEacheren, Canada; Nick Wurl, Ill.; Adam & Hannah Steen, Ind.; Morey & Rhonda Hill, Iowa; Andrew & LaVell Winsor, Kan; Andrew & Jenny Alford, Ky.; Brennan & Serena Gilkison, Ky,; Odis & Tammy Hill, La.; Matthew Doss & Stephanie Francis, Mich.; Aaron Yaggie, Minn.; Ryan & Wendy Wondercheck, Minn.; John Mark Looney, Miss.; Bill Hayen, Mo.; Amanda & Dustin Fairley, Neb.; Brent Svoboda, Neb.; Brad Macauley, N.Y.; Christopher & Cherish Naylor, N.C.; Jarred Billadeau, N.D.; Dan & Cindy Sturgill, Ohio; Cliff & Hailey Barron, S.C.; Antron Williams, S.C.; Brandon Wipf, S.D.; John Dodson & Kristi Kosman, Tenn.; Glenn & Amanda Dye, Va.; and Brad & Nicole Kremer, Wis.

“Commodity Classic provided an ideal venue for the ASA DuPont Young Leaders to continue to strengthen their leadership skills and learn more about the policies that impact agriculture,” said DuPont Pioneer Sr. Industry Relations Manager Randy Wanke. “We have been very impressed with the caliber of the 31st class of Young Leaders and greatly appreciate ASA’s commitment to leadership development.”

For more information about the ASA DuPont Young Leader Program click here.

###
ASA represents all U.S. soybean farmers on domestic and international issues of importance to the soybean industry. ASA’s advocacy efforts are made possible through voluntary farmer membership by farmers in 30 states where soybeans are grown.

For more information contact:
Christine Luelf, ASA Industry and State Relations Manager, 314-754-1291, cluelf@soy.org

Special Recognition Given to Women Leaders Who’ve Served Wisconsin Soybean Programs January 20th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: January 20, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Special Recognition Given to Women Leaders Who’ve Served Wisconsin Soybean Programs

Madison, WI, January 20, 2015 – Farmer leaders are the cornerstone of the strong soybean organizations in Wisconsin. Among the vast number of excellent leaders who have served on the Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) and the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, there have been many women who have given their time, talent and intellect to build a great soybean industry for our state.

“Wisconsin Soybean Programs would like to take the opportunity to recognize the leadership and work that many women have contributed to our organizations and the industry,” says Robert Karls, executive director of Wisconsin Soybean Programs. “We appreciate all of the time and effort they’ve given to strengthen our organizations.”

Alice Van Bogaert was involved with WSA in the early 1990s. Her husband was a founding member of WSA in 1973. Van Bogaert provided leadership for the Wisconsin Volunteer program and conducted many cooking demonstrations. Van Bogaert was always eager to work for the betterment of the organization and was very dedicated to the Wisconsin soybean mission.

Judy Klahn was a groundbreaker for WSA, serving as the first female president of the organization in 1999. She served on the board from 1997-2003 in all. Klahn and her husband Tom of raised soybeans, corn and vegetables near Lodi. The Klahns have always been actively involved in agricultural groups throughout the years. Judy enjoyed being a part of the legislative process and promoting Wisconsin’s soybean industry. She loved the opportunity to lead that organization and do what was best for soybean growers throughout the state. In 2009, Judy Klahn was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. Klahn was a great proponent of the Wisconsin Soybean industry and opened the doors of opportunity for other women to get more involved in agriculture.

Vicky Coughlin of Watertown was involved Wisconsin Soybean Association more than a decade ago. She became president of WSA in 2002. Coughlin and her husband Gene farm the land that has been in the Coughlin family since 1852. After serving in WSA, Coughlin continues to promote agriculture in many ways including serving as a representative for the Farmers Feed Us organization. Coughlin takes pride in knowing that her family is producing food on the same land that has been in production for generations. She has been instrumental in spreading the message of the role of farming in feeding the world. Coughlin knows there is considerable amount of risk and hard work in farming but the reward of being in an industry that has a high positive impact on the lives of others throughout the world is rewarding.

Lorraine Birschbach of Malone was also a pioneer for the WSA who served from 1990 to 1996 and then went on to serve nine years for the American Soybean Association (ASA). In 2003 she received the Lifetime Achievement Award for Membership from American Soybean Association.

She believed that a strong grassroots foundation was the key for policy development and the effectiveness of the organizations. She worked tirelessly for soybean issues in Wisconsin and across the United States. Birschbach was recognized many years for top membership recruiting. She always had membership forms with her and was ready to add more farmers as members to the soybean associations. She believed in a strong membership base and encouraged others to become involved.

Nancy Kavazanjian works tirelessly to promote and educate people about agriculture. She served on WSA from 1987 to 1990. She is currently serving her fourth year as director for the United Soybean Board. Nancy and her husband, Charles Hammer, grow corn, soybeans and wheat near Beaver Dam. Kavazanjian has been active in many areas of Wisconsin agriculture.

She is the newly elected Chairperson of the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance and past communications director for the Wisconsin Corn Growers Association She also served a term on the Agricultural Advisory Board of the Chicago Federal Reserve Bank from 1989-90. She works with the CommonGround initiative in Wisconsin and is an organizer of the annual Corn/Soy EXPO. Kavazanjian has met numerous grain buyers from other countries who have visited Wisconsin. In addition, Kavazanjian has traveled extensively promoting soybeans and byproducts through livestock and other uses.

Sherry Olson recently completed a term as WSA president. Olson, of Black River Falls, serves on the board as an industry representative and was asked to join the board several years ago. Olson has enjoyed the diversity of the individuals who serve on the board and she has gained a great deal of respect for how hard the board works to serve the members and the soybean growers in Wisconsin.

Julia Engler also is currently serving on WSA. She first came to the WSA Board in 2011 and is an industry representative on the board. Engler has also enjoyed meeting and working with farmers to help build a strong industry for Wisconsin and the nation. Wisconsin Soybean extends a thank you to these and many other women who have helped the organization over the years. Their work opened the doors for other women who are eager to serve the soybean industry and all of agriculture.

Again, Wisconsin Soybean Programs thanks these women and many others who have given their time to this industry. We look forward to adding more great women to our organizations in the future.

###
The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level.

Should Wisconsin Farmers Use Soybean Maturity Group as Tool for Variety Selection? January 13th, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: January 13, 2015
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Should Wisconsin Farmers Use Soybean Maturity Group as Tool for Variety Selection?

Madison, WI, January 13, 2015 – For 2015, Wisconsin farmers may be asking, ‘how much weight should we give to maturity group when making seed decisions’?  “Not much,” according to Shawn Conley, University of Wisconsin (UW) Extension soybean specialist.

Conley says in recent years, there has been a subtle shift across much of the northern soybean growing region to planting later maturity group soybeans.

“This shift, either conscious or unconscious, may be attributed to earlier planting dates, relatively favorable fall harvest windows, and the drive for maximum yield as influenced by high commodity prices,” Conley says. “As with all trends sooner or later, we have a correction year. 2014 was that year for many farmers.  So now, as farmers, consultants and the battered and bruised seed suppliers sort through the plethora of product offerings for 2015 they again will be considering maturity group decisions.”

In 2011, the Wisconsin Soybean Research Program published an article in the journal Crop Management entitled: “Optimal Soybean Maturity Groups for Seed Yield and Quality in Wisconsin” (Furseth et al, 2011). In this data set, researchers looked at 893 varieties across six growing seasons (2004-2009) and three production regions in Wisconsin.

“Within each region we identified the optimal maturity group range for maximum yield,” Conley says. “Those were 2.6-2.9, 2.1-2.4, and 2.0-2.2 for our southern, central and north central regions respectively. Figures suggest that regardless of growing region in Wisconsin, growers can select a variety that is almost one full maturity group earlier than the optimal maturity group range for maximum yield and still be within 10 percent of maximum yield.”

“In our recently released 2014 WI Soybean Variety Test Results book, the maturity group range that included a starred variety (starred varieties do not differ from the highest yield variety in that test) was 1.9-2.8, 1.1-2.4,and 0.9-2.0 in our southern, central and north central regions respectively,” says Conley. “This amplifies my assertion that the “relative” maturity group rating is trumped by individual cultivar genetic yield potential.”

“As seed decisions are made for 2015, it is fine to keep the relative maturity rating on your check list, just don’t have it near the top,” says Conley.

To read Conley’s complete assessment of using soybean maturity group ranges for variety selection, visit http://thesoyreport.blogspot.com/.

###
The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin’s 11,000 soybean growers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. The Wisconsin Soybean Association (WSA) represents soybean farmer-members to positively impact regulatory and legislative issues on a local, state and national level.

Machinery Pete Coming to Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo December 4th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: December 4, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Machinery Pete Coming to Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo

Editor Contact: Nancy Kavazanjian
nkavy@powerweb.net
920-887-2471

WISCONSIN DELLS – A change in plans for this winter’s Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo brings farm machinery expert Greg Peterson, widely known as Machinery Pete, to the Kalahari Conference Center for an 8:00 a.m. Early Riser Session, Friday, Jan. 30.

Peterson has been researching and analyzing machinery auction prices for more than 20 years and will share that knowledge and the latest inside scoop on used machinery at Wisconsin’s top winter crop event.

Broadcaster and agricultural commentator John Phipps is moderating the Jan. 30 general session at the 2015 Corn/Soy Expo that includes state issues updates and the outlook for corn and soybean world demand. Later in the day, South Dakota Farmer Brian Hefty discusses crop agronomics then takes questions from the audience while broadcasting his Ag PhD radio show.

Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo kicks off Thursday, Jan. 29, 8:00 a.m., at the Kalahari Conference Center with an update on new farm bill programs from UW-Extension Agricultural Economist Paul Mitchell. Other featured speakers include David Kohl, Professor Emeritus Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech, and professional speaker Damian Mason, who applies his own brand of humor to the business of farming.

Educational breakout sessions planned for the 2015 Corn/Soy Expo will provide information on marketing, the new farm bill, precision ag, cover crops, nitrogen management, corn and soybean agronomics, soil testing, fungicide use, using big data and other agronomic related topic. Continuing education credits for Certified Crop Consultants will be offered in many of these sessions.

The annual Corn/Soy Expo is a great opportunity to mix farm business with family time. Members of the Wisconsin Soybean Association and the Wisconsin Corn Growers Association save $50 on registration to the 2-day event, which includes free admission to the annual Pork Producers Taste of Elegance, morning coffee & rolls, two lunches, snacks, an evening reception, industry trade show and admission to all programs. Extra Taste of Elegance tickets can be purchased for family and friends at a reduced rate when registering for Corn/Soy Expo. All attendees can save $40 on admission by registering for the event before January 15.

A special reduced hotel rate is available at the Kalahari for registered Corn/Soy Expo attendees at $112 per night, plus state & local tax, for a standard room with 2-double beds on Wednesday, Jan. 28 and Thursday, Jan. 29. Friday and Saturday night rates are higher, very limited and must include a Thursday night stay. Hotel policy requires advance payment for the first night stay and charges a fee for cancellations. This special hotel rate is good only until January 5, 2015.

Registration materials for Corn/Soy Expo are available online at www.CornSoyExpo.org and also can be requested by calling the Wisconsin Soybean Program office at 608-274-7522 or the Wisconsin Corn Program office at 262-495-2232. ###

2015 Wisconsin Corn/Soy Expo Program and Registration – Download the Brochure

2015 Crop Updates Offered at Regional Wisconsin Soybean Grower Conferences November 13th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: November 13, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

2015 Crop Updates Offered at Regional Wisconsin Soybean Grower Conferences

Madison, WI, November 13, 2014—A series of one-day Wisconsin Soybean Growers Conferences will prepare farmers for the 2015 season. In early December, growers, media and others interested in the state’s $59 billion agriculture economy will converge at regional soybean conferences held around the state. More than 75 farmers are expected to attend each of the conferences, where they will receive updates for next year’s growing season. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, these day-long events are scheduled for December 2in Janesville, December 3 in Eau Claire and December 4 in Ripon.

Workshops at the series of Wisconsin Soybean Grower Conferences will cover a wide range of agricultural concerns and issues. At each location, the topics will include presentations on 2014 Soybean Diseases, Marketing Hints for 2015, and Irrigation, Soil and Water Management. Among the expert presenters is Dr. Shawn Conley, Soybean Extension Specialist at University of Wisconsin, Madison. He says, “Growers will learn what is new from a seed, crop protection and inoculants perspective, as well as managing inputs for 2015.”

Mike Cerny, president of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board adds that the conferences offer soybean farmers a great opportunity. “Attendees will be able to obtain up-to-date information so they can make more informed decisions for the 2015 planting season,” Cerny says. The workshops also offer soybean farmers a chance to ask questions of the expert presenters.

Here are the conference dates and locations. Each event runs from 9 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

  • The Janesville Wisconsin Soybean Conference will be presented Tuesday, December 2, at the Holiday Inn, 3100 Wellington Place.
  • The Eau Claire Wisconsin Soybean Conference takes place Wednesday, December 3, at the Sleep Inn Suites and Conference Center, 5872 33rdAvenue.
  • The Ripon Wisconsin Soybean Conference convenes on Thursday, December 4, at Royal Ridges, 1 Westgate Drive.

For particulars about the conferences and more information about Wisconsin-grown soybeans, visit the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board website at www.wisoybean.org.

#

The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin soybean producers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. WSMB is committed to providing statewide soy education and outreach programs that inform consumers about the benefits of soy. It offers a comprehensive soy curriculum for educators, and partners with the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Ag in the Classroom to provide Soybean Science Kits and lessons that increase agricultural literacy.

The Impact of Animal Agriculture for Wisconsin Soybeans November 12th, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: November 12, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

The Impact of Animal Agriculture for Wisconsin Soybeans

Infographic link at end of release

Madison, WI, Nov. 13, 2014— Wisconsin’s animal agriculture sector benefits soybean farmers who depend on livestock and poultry that consume soybean meal. In addition, a successful animal agriculture industry supports the state’s economy by creating jobs, according to a study by the United Soybean Board (USB).

The USB contracted with Agralytica to provide current estimates of the economic impacts of animal agriculture at the national, state and local levels.  In 2013, animal agriculture had the following positive national economic impacts:

1,984,000 » Job impact throughout the economy
$371 billion » Impact on total output in the economy
$65 billion » Impact on household incomes
$16 billion » Impact on income taxes paid
$7 billion » Impact on property taxes paid.

In the 2012/13 marketing year, domestic animal agriculture consumed 28.4 million tons of soybean meal in the United States – by far the largest source of soybean meal demand. This was a decrease of about two million tons due to very high protein feed prices. However, industry data confirm that soybean meal did hold its own in poultry and hog rations against other protein sources like canola meal and distillers dried grains (DDGS). Animal agriculture encompasses mainly beef cattle, hogs, broilers, turkeys, eggs, dairy, and aquaculture. Future soybean demand is tightly linked to the health of these industries.

In Wisconsin, demand for soybean meal continues to be strong, especially as livestock production grows. In 2012/13, 510,000 tons of soybean meal was consumed by animals in Wisconsin. There was particular large growth in broiler production for the state. According to the study, dairy cattle are the biggest soybean meal eaters in Wisconsin, followed by turkeys, broilers and hogs.

In addition, animal agriculture has a huge impact on the economics of each state and the nation.
Across all states, the total output impact of animal agriculture in 2013 was $371 billion. The effect on household earnings was $65 billion, and the sector is responsible for 1.98 million jobs. The employment impact exceeds 10,000 jobs in 36 of the states, exceeds 100,000 jobs in California, Iowa, and Wisconsin, and tops 240,000 jobs in Texas.

“Soybean farmers recognize the importance of a strong animal agriculture industry that is a boost to our locals and state economies,” says Mike Cerny of Sharon, president of the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board. “We look forward to continuing to work with our fellow farmers in growing a strong livestock industry for our state.”

For more details on the USB /Animal Agriculture Economic Analysis, read the entire study at www.wisoybean.org.

http://wisoybean.org/about_soy/annual_wi_soy_meal_usage.php

###

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker Issues Proclamation Declaring September 2014 as Soybean Month September 2nd, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: September 2, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker Issues Proclamation Declaring September 2014 as Soybean Month

For Immediate Release 

Madison, WI, September 2, 2014—Wisconsin-grown soybeans have earned prestigious recognition this harvest season as Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker proclaims September 2014 as Soybean Month. Soybeans are important not only to local communities but also to the state’s economy. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that Wisconsin farmers will harvest a record amount of soybeans this year.  According to the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board, the state has 11,000 soybean farmers. Gov. Scott Walker’s proclamation notes that the State of Wisconsin and its agricultural economy benefit significantly from the production of soybeans. Animal agriculture is the top consumer of soybean meal. In 2012, animal agriculture accounted for 111,000 jobs in Wisconsin, an economic output of $1.6 billion and $2.9 billion worth of household income.  “Wisconsin Soybean Farmers are very pleased and proud to have September proclaimed as Soybean Month. We are also looking forward to the many international buyers coming into the state for the Global Grain  Exchange Conference in Milwaukee as more than one half of all the soybeans grown in Wisconsin are exported.  This is an opportunity to showcase our state and the soybean industry” explains Bob Karls, Executive Director, Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board.

From September 15 to 18, Milwaukee, WI, will be the host city for the 2014 U.S. Soy Global Trade Exchange and Midwest Specialty Grains Conference and Trade show. The event, sponsored by the U.S. Soybean Export Council and Midwest Shippers Association, will bring approximately 270 international soy and grain trade buyer delegation members to Wisconsin from around the world. Speakers welcoming the attendees on opening day include Jim Sutter, C.E.O. of the U.S. Soybean Export Council; Bruce Abbe, Executive Director of the Midwest Shippers Association; Ben Brancel, Wisconsin Secretary of Agriculture; and Phil Karsting, Administrator, U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agriculture Service.

Also on the conference opening day, David Hightower of Hightower Associates and The Hightower Report will deliver the keynote address. His address will be followed by a panel, Changing Leadership for Global Food and Agriculture Industries, providing an international perspective with panel moderator Sara Wyant, Editor/Publisher of Agri-Pulse, Washington, DC. Panelists include Theresa Babuscio PhD, Secretary General COCERAL of Brussels, Belgium; and Mariela Urquia, First Vice President, AFACA, Venezuela Feed Manufacturers’ Association. Information about the conference can be found on the website at www.grainconference.org.

For details about Wisconsin-grown soybeans and their uses, visit the Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board website at www.wisoybean.org.

#

The Wisconsin Soybean Marketing Board (WSMB) is a grassroots, farmer-led organization that leads efforts in soybean research and the expansion of soybean market opportunities. Established in 1983 as part of a Wisconsin-mandated checkoff, the board works every day to maximize the profitability of Wisconsin soybean producers. It builds soybean demand, creates new uses for soybeans, and focuses on soybean disease research. WSMB is committed to providing statewide soy education and outreach programs that inform consumers about the benefits of soy. It offers a comprehensive soy curriculum for educators, and partners with the Wisconsin Farm Bureau Ag in the Classroom to provide Soybean Science Kits and lessons that increase agricultural literacy.

Farmers across the Midwest may be concerned about white mold in soybeans this year July 22nd, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: July 22, 2014
Media Contact: 
Linda Funk
Flavorful Insight, 515-491-8636
lfunk@flavorfulinsight.com

Interviews & photos
available upon request.

News Releases

Farmers across the Midwest may be concerned about white mold in soybeans this year

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Linda Funk, Flavorful Insight
ph. 515-491-8636

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Madison, WI, July 2014 — Farmers across the Midwest may be concerned about white mold in soybeans this year.

White Mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is not common every year in this region, but farmers that have battled the disease in the past will want to assess the risk of white mold development as soybeans approach flowering (growth stage R1 – plants have at least one open flower at any node).

“White mold development is favored by cool, cloudy, wet, humid weather at flowering,” says Damon Smith, assistant professor of plant pathology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “The disease is more problematic in soybeans in high-yield environments where high plant populations, narrow row spacing, and an early-closing canopy are commonly used.”

In the temperate north central soybean production areas of the United States, white mold can be a significant yield limiting disease. Yield can be reduced two-to-five bushels per acre for every 10 percent increment increase in white mold incidence in soybeans at the R7 growth stage. These impacts on yield are significant and make white mold one of the most important diseases of soybean in the north central United States.

White mold can survive for many years in soils; therefore it is difficult to use crop rotation to control it. In soybeans, infection occurs via flowers during bloom. Incidence of white mold can be sporadic from one year to the next, and one field to another, because of specific environmental requirements necessary for infection. White mold incidence is often greater in fields with high yield potential resulting in a dense canopy and in situations where plants are in narrow rows and at high population. In these instances, canopy humidity and wetness can be high thereby promoting increased incidence of white mold.

“Management of white mold can include reduced tillage, crop rotation, canopy management, irrigation management, weed control, and chemical control,” says Smith. “Chemical control of white mold is variable.”

There are fungicides available for in-season management of white mold, however not all commonly used fungicides are labeled for use against white mold in soybean. For information on which fungicides are labeled for disease control and recommendations on fungicide efficacy, visit
http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/files/2013/07/2014-Soybean-Fungicide-efficacy-table.pdf
Fungicide recommendations are developed by the NCERA-137 national soybean disease committee, and recommendations are based on replicated research data collected from university trials.

“Last year, in Wisconsin numerous products were evaluated for white mold control in soybean,” Smith says.

Results of this trial can be viewed on the summary found at  http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/files/2013/11/2013-Fungicide-Test-Summary.pdf
Scroll down to pages 6 and 7.

“Consistent with results of the NCERA-137 research, our Wisconsin research identified several products having a rating of ‘good’ for white mold management, including Aproach, Endura, and Proline,” Smith says. “If using fungicides for white mold management, keep in mind that efficacy may be based on the ability of the fungicide to penetrate into the canopy, and the timing of the fungicide application. Fungicides will be most effective at reducing the impact of white mold when applied at, or close to, growth stage R1.”

Wisconsin research data indicates that fungicides applied up to growth stage R3 (early pod – pods are 3/16-inch long at one of the four uppermost nodes) may be effective, but later applications will likely not be effective at reducing disease. Once symptoms of white mold are evident, fungicides will have no effect on reducing the disease. Fungicide applications for white mold management may be most useful on fields where varieties rated as susceptible to white mold are planted in a field with a history of the disease.

“If a soybean field is diagnosed with high levels of white mold, this field should be harvested last,” Smith says. “This will help reduce the movement of the survival structures of the white mold fungus by harvesting equipment, to fields that are not infested. Also, be sure to clean all harvesting equipment thoroughly at the end of the season to avoid inadvertent infestation of fields.”

Read more on soybean white mold at http://fyi.uwex.edu/fieldcroppathology/2014/07/01/managing-white-mold-in-soybean/. There is also a University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension video that shows symptoms of white mold and discusses management options for the disease. The video can be found on YouTube at www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2qFTJyX_P0.

###